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[BOAI] Bethesda statement

From: Peter Suber <peters AT earlham.edu>
Date: Wed, 02 Jul 2003 15:28:54 -0500


Threading:      • This Message
             [BOAI] Bethesda statement from peters AT earlham.edu

[Forwarding from Ellen Paul.  I will bring these and other comments on the 
Bethesda statement to the attention of the Bethesda group when it 
reconvenes in a few months.  --Peter.]


Dear Dr. Suber,

I hope you will forward these comments to the signers of the Bethesda 
Statement.

Your goals and principles are entirely laudable, but I fear that you have 
no understanding of the financial realities of scientific disciplines that 
do not share in the riches of research funding that is available to 
disciplines such as biomedical research, and of the financial realities of 
many small scientific societies.

The Ornithological Council represents 11 scientific ornithological 
societies in the Western Hemisphere. Seven of these are in the United 
States. Six of them publish peer-reviewed journals in the traditional 
sense. Four have already made journal content available for free on the 
internet, 1 - 2 years after publication. This has been an expensive 
proposition for them, but they felt that the material should be easily 
accessible.

However, to protect the subscription rate, which is the primary source of 
income for most of them, they do not make it available immediately. 
Unfortunately, many short-sighted scientists who have access to content via 
BioOne or other, similar sources, drop their society memberships. They seem 
not to know, or care, that ultimately, the loss of revenue will force the 
society, along with the journal, into extinction. Then the research is 
available to no one. The journal won't exist and the previously-published 
material will vanish from the internet because the society will no longer 
be available to maintain the website.

Your principles are laudable but frankly, you seem arrogant in failing to 
realize that many smaller scientific societies outside the realm of 
biomedicine and similarly well-funded research disciplines are imperiled by 
completely free access. I hope you will consider the potential impact of 
your view -which some would take a step further, wishing to mandate open 
access - and modify your statement to address the concerns we have raised.

Sincerely,

Ellen Paul

-- 
Ellen Paul
Executive Director
The Ornithological Council
Phone: (301)986-8568
Mailto:epaul AT concentric.net
Ornithological Council Website:  http://www.nmnh.si.edu/BIRDNET
"Providing Scientific Information about Birds"



[BOAI] FOS Newsletter resumes publication

From: peters AT earlham.edu
Date: 2003-07-04


Threading:      • This Message
             [BOAI] OAI compliant from lqthede AT apk.net
             [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com

ATTACHMENT: message.html!


[BOAI] OAI compliant

From: "Linda Q. Thede" <lqthede AT apk.net>
Date: Fri, 04 Jul 2003 14:47:42 -0400


Threading: [BOAI] FOS Newsletter resumes publication from peters AT earlham.edu
      • This Message
             Re: [BOAI] OAI compliant from simeon AT cs.cornell.edu

Is the tag set described at 
http://dtd.nlm.nih.gov/tag-library/index.html  OAI compliant?

-- 
Linda Q. Thede
435-4 Chandler Drive
Aurora, OH 44202
lqthede AT apk.net
330-562-3281




Re: [BOAI] OAI compliant

From: Simeon Warner <simeon AT cs.cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2003 16:56:09 -0400 (EDT)


Threading: [BOAI] OAI compliant from lqthede AT apk.net
      • This Message


On Fri, 4 Jul 2003, Linda Q. Thede wrote:
> Is the tag set described at 
> http://dtd.nlm.nih.gov/tag-library/index.html  OAI compliant?

All OAI exchanged XML must validate against an XML schema. This tag
library appears to be described using DTDs and thus "isn't OAI 
compliant"  
(or perhaps more helpfully: can't be used for metadata exchange via OAI).

However, there is nothing to stop someone writing a schema for the
format(s) described by this tag library. Exchange of metadata using these 
tags would then be possible using OAI.

Cheers,
Simeon.


[BOAI] Bethesda statement

From: Peter Suber <peters AT earlham.edu>
Date: Fri, 04 Jul 2003 17:33:53 -0500


Threading: [BOAI] Bethesda statement from peters AT earlham.edu
      • This Message

[Forwarding from Ellen Paul.  This is a follow-up to her July 2 posting on 
the Bethesda statement on open-access publishing, 
<http://threader.ecs.soton.ac.uk/lists/boaiforum/88.html>, and its effect 

on small society publishers.  --Peter.]


Thanks, Peter.

Here is an example that you might want to share:

The Wilson Ornithological Society, founded in 1888 and named for Alexander 
Wilson, father of American ornithology, has about 2,500 members. Many are 
"amateur ornithologists."  It is an important society not only for 
historical reasons, but also because it has a special interest in 
undergraduate education. The WOS has recently published the only lab manual 
for ornithology.  Dues are $21 /year; $15/year for students.* It has 
revenue of less than $100,000 per year and assets of under a million dollars.

* Because there are 7 ornithological societies in North America, each is 
forced to charge relatively low dues because most ornithologists belong to 
more than one society. The most expensive of the seven charges $42/year. 
All are raising rates in this coming year, but even with the increases, the 
rates will be very low. One can join all 7 for under $200/year.

All issues of Wilson Bulletin (from the first issue in 1889 to the most 
recent issue) are now available in full-text electronic versions.  This 
means that you can read and print any paper, note, or review published in 
Wilson Bulletin on your personal computer.  Also, you can search the entire 
series for papers on a particular topic or species, or for all publications 
by a particular author.

All issues of Wilson Bulletin published before 2000 are accessible through 
the University on New Mexico library web site 
(http://elibrary.unm.edu/wilson/).  Until recently this site was under 
construction, but Blair Wolf (who is coordinating this effort) reports that 
the site has been tested and is now fully functional.  I have discussed 
this with Charles Blem and he agrees that we should make a public 
announcement about the availability of the site.  I will therefore send an 
announcement to the editor of OSNA.  John Smallwood said that he will 
include an announcement in Wilson Bulletin.
The University of New Mexico web site is free, so back issues of the 
journal are now readily available to anyone in the world with internet 
access.  Full-text reproductions of all papers are available as either PDF 
or DjVu files.  I found that the DjVu files work more quickly and 
smoothly.   To use the DjVu files, you may need to download the DjVu 
program from Lizardtech and then install it on your hard drive.  You can do 
this for free from the home page of the Wilson Bulletin site at the 
University of New Mexico library.

All issues of Wilson Bulletin published since 2000 are available through 
BioOne (http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?request=index-html), a subscription 
service that is generally accessible at academic libraries.  BioOne 
provides a readable, full-text version of each paper, and the text of the 
paper can be searched for terms or names. One can go directly to a 
reference, table or figure by clicking on a button next to the 
citation.  Also, papers can be displayed in a printable format.


-- 
Ellen Paul
Executive Director
The Ornithological Council
Mailto:epaul AT concentric.net
Ornithological Council Website:  http://www.nmnh.si.edu/BIRDNET
"Providing Scientific Information about Birds"




[BOAI] Merger of Springer and Kluwer

From: peters AT earlham.edu
Date: 2003-07-09


ATTACHMENT: message.html!


[BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

From: Peter Murray <peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 12:00:15 +0100


Threading: [BOAI] FOS Newsletter resumes publication from peters AT earlham.edu
      • This Message
             Re: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from harnad AT ecs.soton.ac.uk
             Re: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from sseaprod AT bigpond.net.au

A question/issue that I think is relevant to discussions on this list, and 
that I would like to try and get some opinions, or guidance, on.

If we are talking about, and promoting, ideas of open access etc., where do 
we as a group, or individuals stand, on the issue of signing over copyright 
of their work to other organisations, eg publishers, conference organisers, 
etc? I ask as it is an issue I have faced recently, and which I feel will 
increasingly cause problems.

While we want to get discussion of open access etc into a wider forum, can 
we, morally, then say in articles where we are promoting open access that 
we will give up our copyright to the publishers etc? - or do we just 
swallow our principles?

Has anyone else faced similar situations, and how have they tackled it? - 
on the occasion in question, the conference organisers were happy for me to 
give them permission to use the materials under GNU GPL.

Cheers, Peter Murray



[BOAI] Re: Eprints, DSpace or ESpace?

From: Stevan Harnad <harnad AT ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 11:56:28 +0100 (BST)


Threading: [BOAI] Re: EPrints, DSpace or ESpace? from harnad AT ecs.soton.ac.uk
      • This Message

On Thu, 31 Jul 2003, Shirley Sullivan wrote:

> We have an eprint.org repository already established for documents, but 
are 
> interested to see whether it is possible to use the software for metadata 
> records only. or Dspace for this purpose. It appears to be essential for 
> both eprints.org and dspace to actually load "documents" - it 
won't 
> work  for records only. Is this the case, or is to "operator 
error" here, 
> does anyone know? We would like to create an OAI compliant catalogue 
> containing metadata records for objects, but not load the objects 
> themselves. Any advice gratefully received.

Yes, eprints.org archives (and, for that matter, dspace archives)
can be configured so they archive only the metadata and not the
full-text (i.e., with null full-text). Both softwares can be used for
many purposes, but the eprints.org software was expressly created to
promote open access to full text, and not merely metadata archiving and
interoperability. (The OAI protocol itself was originally created in the
service of open access to full text, but, once the protocol's importance
and potential power became apparent, the OAI was extended to digital
archiving and interoperability in general, not just to open-access
to full-text.)

Here are the 5 major current categories of uses for institutional
OAI archives. Both softwares (and others) can be used for all 5
purposes, but the eprints.org software, to repeat, is dedicated 
specifically to number *5 (self-archiving of full-text of refereed
research). We are very anxious to avoid diffusing or slowing the movement
toward the urgent and reachable goal of open access by diverting
the eprints.org software toward 1-4. 1-4 are implementable, yes, but *5
is the paramount concern; 1-4 are merely distractions from *5 at this time:

The 5 uses for Institutional Digital Archiving Software
http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/Hypermail/Amsci/2670.html

1. Institutional Digital Collection Management (both institutional
   output, and bought-in content)
2. Institutional Digital Content Preservation (both institutional
   output and bought-in content)
3. Institutional Digital Courseware
4. Institutional Digital Publishing (e-journals, e-books, )

*5. Institutional Self-Archiving of Research Output (pre- and post-
    peer-reviewed publication)*

The purpose of *5 is to maximize institutional research impact:
http://www.eprints.org/self-faq/#institution-facilitate-filling
http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/Temp/self-archiving.ppt
http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/Temp/che.htm

While we're on the subject, a variant and cousin of 4, namely, open-access
publishing (BOAI-2) has lately been getting so much attention that the
the misleading impression has grown that open-access publishing is either
the only form, or the main form, of open access! Here are the facts,
in context:

(1) Most of the refereed research literature is still not open-access.

(2) Of the small but growing portion of the refereed research literature
that is open-access already, by far the largest proportion of that is
open-access via self-archiving (BOAI-1, Archiving-5, above) rather than
via open-access publishing (BOAI-2, related to Archiving-4, above).

(3) Of the small but growing portion of the refereed research literature
that is open-access already, by far the fastest-growing proportion of that is
open-access via self-archiving (BOAI-1, Archiving-5, above) rather than
via open-access publishing (BOAI-2, related to Archiving-4, above).

The two open-access strategies (BOAI-1 and BOAI-2) are complementary,
but it is important for researchers and their institutions to have the
optimal joint strategy clearly in mind:

    If there exists a suitable open-access journal for you to publish
    your research in (about 5% currently), publish it there! If not
    (95%), then publish it in a toll-access journal and self-archive
    the full text (pre- and post-peer-review) in your institutional
    eprint archive. 

Stevan Harnad

NOTE: A complete archive of the ongoing discussion of providing open
access to the peer-reviewed research literature online is available at
the American Scientist September Forum (98 & 99 & 00 & 01 & 02 
& 03):

    http://amsci-forum.amsci.org/archives/september98-forum.html
                            or
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/Hypermail/Amsci/index.html

Discussion can be posted to: september98-forum AT amsci-forum.amsci.org 





RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

From: Subbiah Arunachalam <arun AT mssrf.res.in>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 09:58:36 +0530


Threading:      • This Message
             RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from cciucu AT cedu.ro
             RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from juliana AT tin.it

Friends:

I am an Indian researcher and I speak for most of our colleagues in the
developing world. The copyright should remain with the author(s) of a paper
(or any intellectual or artistic product). While we publish a paper in a
journal we only give them the first right to publish.No publisher, in the
new order of things, should demand transfer of copyright (from the author to
the publisher). Please refer to the many articles written by Stevan Harnad.

Thanks and best wishes.

Arun

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Murray [mailto:peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com]
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2003 4:30 PM
To: boai-forum AT ecs.soton.ac.uk
Subject: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question


A question/issue that I think is relevant to discussions on this list, and 
that I would like to try and get some opinions, or guidance, on.

If we are talking about, and promoting, ideas of open access etc., where do 
we as a group, or individuals stand, on the issue of signing over copyright 
of their work to other organisations, eg publishers, conference organisers, 
etc? I ask as it is an issue I have faced recently, and which I feel will 
increasingly cause problems.

While we want to get discussion of open access etc into a wider forum, can 
we, morally, then say in articles where we are promoting open access that 
we will give up our copyright to the publishers etc? - or do we just 
swallow our principles?

Has anyone else faced similar situations, and how have they tackled it? - 
on the occasion in question, the conference organisers were happy for me to 
give them permission to use the materials under GNU GPL.

Cheers, Peter Murray


ATTACHMENT: message.html!


Re: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

From: Stevan Harnad <harnad AT ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 12:00:57 +0100 (BST)


Threading: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com
      • This Message

See the Project Romeo site:

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/ls/disresearch/romeo/index.html

and also:

http://www.eprints.org/self-faq/#copyright1

On Mon, 28 Jul 2003, Peter Murray wrote:

> A question/issue that I think is relevant to discussions on this list, and 

> that I would like to try and get some opinions, or guidance, on.
> 
> If we are talking about, and promoting, ideas of open access etc., where 
do 
> we as a group, or individuals stand, on the issue of signing over 
copyright 
> of their work to other organisations, eg publishers, conference 
organisers, 
> etc? I ask as it is an issue I have faced recently, and which I feel will 
> increasingly cause problems.
> 
> While we want to get discussion of open access etc into a wider forum, can 

> we, morally, then say in articles where we are promoting open access that 
> we will give up our copyright to the publishers etc? - or do we just 
> swallow our principles?
> 
> Has anyone else faced similar situations, and how have they tackled it? - 
> on the occasion in question, the conference organisers were happy for me 
to 
> give them permission to use the materials under GNU GPL.


Re: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

From: "Siegfried Angerer" <sseaprod AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 23:14:43 +1000


Threading: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com
      • This Message

Greetings
Reply to "Peter Murray" <peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com>
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2003 9:00 PM
Subject: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

Yes! The issue raised its head throughout the Copyright discussion forum
more than 12 month ago.
As an online content producer, developer, writer etc, I faced the issue as
early as 1995. The bottom line is the first simple question you have to ask
yourself - what and how much are you prepared to give away for nothing.
The second simple question is - who else owns a stake, or can in some way
make a claim on your intellectually rights or property ( the two things are
distinct and separate ) "Note in most cases your University employer 
claims
that the wage paid to you, delivers an unchallengeable ownership claim and a
subsequent right to commercialise the fruits of your labour in any way it
sees fit. (???)
The third simple question is - what are your own intentions - Journal
articles are often delivered for academic prestige, peer recognition and
related reasons of academic advancement, or even for the less selfless among
us - the sheer delight in furthering human knowledge. So what is it you wish
to achieve and why?
Regards
Siegfried Angerer
Director SEA Pty Ltd (R&D Trust - specialists in online distributed 
learning
and teaching)



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Peter Murray" <peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com>
To: <boai-forum AT ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2003 9:00 PM
Subject: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question


> A question/issue that I think is relevant to discussions on this list, and
> that I would like to try and get some opinions, or guidance, on.
>
> If we are talking about, and promoting, ideas of open access etc., where
do
> we as a group, or individuals stand, on the issue of signing over
copyright
> of their work to other organisations, eg publishers, conference
organisers,
> etc? I ask as it is an issue I have faced recently, and which I feel will
> increasingly cause problems.
>
> While we want to get discussion of open access etc into a wider forum, can
> we, morally, then say in articles where we are promoting open access that
> we will give up our copyright to the publishers etc? - or do we just
> swallow our principles?
>
> Has anyone else faced similar situations, and how have they tackled it? -
> on the occasion in question, the conference organisers were happy for me
to
> give them permission to use the materials under GNU GPL.
>
> Cheers, Peter Murray
>
>



RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

From: "Ciprian Ciucu" <cciucu AT cedu.ro>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 16:38:05 +0300


Threading: RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from arun AT mssrf.res.in
      • This Message

I recently faced this issue...
I was browsing on internet and I found this e-on-line library selling my
political analysis articles. Anyone how wants to red this articles would
have to pay around 3 euros for each one. I'm gainning nothing. I publised
this articles for free in some cultural maggazine, but it was my choise.
I was angry because nobody asked me how I feel about this ideea......

Best whishes,

Ciprian Ciucu




-----Original Message-----
From: Siegfried Angerer [mailto:sseaprod AT bigpond.net.au]
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2003 4:15 PM
To: BOAI Forum
Subject: Re: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question


Greetings
Reply to "Peter Murray" <peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com>
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2003 9:00 PM
Subject: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

Yes! The issue raised its head throughout the Copyright discussion forum
more than 12 month ago. As an online content producer, developer, writer
etc, I faced the issue as early as 1995. The bottom line is the first
simple question you have to ask yourself - what and how much are you
prepared to give away for nothing. The second simple question is - who
else owns a stake, or can in some way make a claim on your intellectually
rights or property ( the two things are distinct and separate ) "Note in
most cases your University employer claims that the wage paid to you,
delivers an unchallengeable ownership claim and a subsequent right to
commercialise the fruits of your labour in any way it sees fit. (???) The
third simple question is - what are your own intentions - Journal articles
are often delivered for academic prestige, peer recognition and related
reasons of academic advancement, or even for the less selfless among us -
the sheer delight in furthering human knowledge. So what is it you wish to
achieve and why? Regards Siegfried Angerer Director SEA Pty Ltd (R&D
Trust - specialists in online distributed learning and teaching)



-----
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RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question

From: Julia Bolton Holloway <juliana AT tin.it>
Date: Fri, 01 Aug 2003 20:28:28 +0200


Threading: RE: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question from arun AT mssrf.res.in
      • This Message

I had a similar experience. I found a whole volume of essays I had edited 
and published, which had then been sold back to me, including its 
electronic rights, was then being used as a 'free book' for subscribers of 
Questia. When I queried Questia they said Peter Lang gave them permission. 
But I could not find in Peter Lang who had done so. What troubles me is 
that much of its material had been so costly to obtain, permission rights 
to publish works of art, etc. Did they renegotiate all these? Which would 
be so much more expensive on the web than they are even in a book. Are we 
liable because they used them? Questia never asked my consent as copyright 
holder though a simple Google search would have found me. Like Cyprian 
Ciucu I feel authors and editors deserve the courtesy of a request for 
permission to publish. Did Oxford also give them permission to publish 
Holmes? Have others had this experience with Questia or Lang or Oxford?

http://www.questia.com/aboutQuestia/eventsn2.html gives the following:

                  The Middle Ages was once dismissively called the Dark Ages
                  and reputed to be a time fueled by superstition and 
containing
                  little cultural or intellectual advancement. Now the 
Middle Ages
                  is recognized as an important time in Western European
                  development, and one that directly led to the Renaissance 
that
                  followed.

                  Two of the following books are completely free to read in
                  their entirety from October 11, 2002, through October 18,
                  2002.

Middle Ages
    FREE BOOK!  The Oxford History of Medieval Europe
        edited by George Holmes
    FREE BOOK!  Equally in God's Image: Women in the Middle Ages
        edited by Julia Bolton Holloway, Constance S. Wright, & Joan 
Bechtold

At 16:38 31/07/03 +0300, you wrote:
>I recently faced this issue...
>I was browsing on internet and I found this e-on-line library selling my
>political analysis articles. Anyone how wants to red this articles would
>have to pay around 3 euros for each one. I'm gainning nothing. I publised
>this articles for free in some cultural maggazine, but it was my choise.
>I was angry because nobody asked me how I feel about this ideea......
>
>Best whishes,
>
>Ciprian Ciucu
>
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Siegfried Angerer [mailto:sseaprod AT bigpond.net.au]
>Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2003 4:15 PM
>To: BOAI Forum
>Subject: Re: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question
>
>
>Greetings
>Reply to "Peter Murray" <peter.j.murray AT btinternet.com>
>Sent: Monday, July 28, 2003 9:00 PM
>Subject: [BOAI] Copyright (or left) issues, a question
>
>Yes! The issue raised its head throughout the Copyright discussion forum
>more than 12 month ago. As an online content producer, developer, writer
>etc, I faced the issue as early as 1995. The bottom line is the first
>simple question you have to ask yourself - what and how much are you
>prepared to give away for nothing. The second simple question is - who
>else owns a stake, or can in some way make a claim on your intellectually
>rights or property ( the two things are distinct and separate ) "Note 
in
>most cases your University employer claims that the wage paid to you,
>delivers an unchallengeable ownership claim and a subsequent right to
>commercialise the fruits of your labour in any way it sees fit. (???) The
>third simple question is - what are your own intentions - Journal articles
>are often delivered for academic prestige, peer recognition and related
>reasons of academic advancement, or even for the less selfless among us -
>the sheer delight in furthering human knowledge. So what is it you wish to
>achieve and why? Regards Siegfried Angerer Director SEA Pty Ltd (R&D
>Trust - specialists in online distributed learning and teaching)
>
>
>
>-----
>###########################################
>
>This message has been scanned by F-Secure Anti-Virus for Microsoft
>Exchange.
>For more information, connect to http://www.F-Secure.com/


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