Budapest Open Access Initiative      

Budapest Open Access Initiative: BOAI Forum Archive

[BOAI] [Forum Home] [index] [prev] [next] [options] [help]

boaiforum messages

[BOAI] New data for article

From: David Solomon <dsolomon AT msu.edu>
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2013 07:20:03 -0400


Threading:      • This Message
             [BOAI] Publication Lags, Green OA Embargoes and the Liege/HEFCE/BIS Immediate-Deposit Mandate from harnad AT ecs.soton.ac.uk

--f46d043be000356e1804e642093d
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

We have made the data available for the paper: "The publishing delay in
scholarly peer-reviewed journals" recently accepted for publication in
 Journal of Informetrics.

You can access it here:

Paper http://tinyurl.com/ms5dk2u

Codebook  http://tinyurl.com/m2fwxtk

Data http://tinyurl.com/mslr3c7

Have fun with it and let us know if you find something interesting we
missed.

Bo-Christer Bj=F6rk, David Solomon

Abstract: Publishing in scholarly peer reviewed journals usually entails
long delays from submission to publication.  In part this is due to the
length of the peer review process and in part because of the dominating
tradition of publication in issues, earlier a necessity of paper-based
publishing, which creates backlogs of manuscripts waiting in line. The
delays slow the dissemination of scholarship and can provide a significant
burden on the academic careers of authors.

Using a stratified random sample we studied average publishing delays in
2700 papers published in 135 journals sampled from the Scopus citation
index.  The shortest overall delays occur in science technology and medical
(STM) fields and the longest in social science, arts/humanities and
business/economics. Business/economics with a delay of 18 months took twice
as long as chemistry with a 9 month average delay.  Analysis of the
variance indicated that by far the largest amount of variance in the time
between submission and acceptance was among articles within a journal as
compared with journals, disciplines or the size of the journal.  For the
time between acceptance and publication most of the variation in delay can
be accounted for by differences between specific journals.

--f46d043be000356e1804e642093d
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<div dir=3D"ltr"><div>We have made the data available for 
the paper: &quot;=
The publishing delay in scholarly peer-reviewed journals&quot; recently 
acc=
epted for publication in =A0Journal of Informetrics. 
=A0</div><div><br></di=
v><div>
You can access it 
here:</div><div><br></div><div>Paper <a 
href=3D"http://ti=
nyurl.com/ms5dk2u">http://tinyurl.com/ms5dk2u</a></div><div><br></div><div>=
Codebook =A0<a 
href=3D"http://tinyurl.com/m2fwxtk">http://tinyurl.com/m2fwx=
tk</a></div>
<div>=A0</div><div>Data <a 
href=3D"http://tinyurl.com/mslr3c7">http://tinyu=
rl.com/mslr3c7</a></div><div><br></div><div>Have fun with it and let us kno=
w if you find something interesting we 
missed.</div><div><br></div><div>Bo-=
Christer Bj=F6rk, David Solomon</div>
<div><br></div><div>Abstract: Publishing in scholarly 
peer reviewed journal=
s usually entails long delays from submission to publication. =A0In part th=
is is due to the length of the peer review process and in part because of t=
he dominating tradition of publication in issues, earlier a necessity of pa=
per-based publishing, which creates backlogs of manuscripts waiting in line=
. The delays slow the dissemination of scholarship and can provide a signif=
icant burden on the academic careers of authors.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Using a stratified random sample we 
studied average pub=
lishing delays in 2700 papers published in 135 journals sampled from the Sc=
opus citation index. =A0The shortest overall delays occur in science techno=
logy and medical (STM) fields and the longest in social science, arts/human=
ities and business/economics. Business/economics with a delay of 18 months =
took twice as long as chemistry with a 9 month average delay. =A0Analysis o=
f the variance indicated that by far the largest amount of variance in the =
time between submission and acceptance was among articles within a journal =
as compared with journals, disciplines or the size of the journal. =A0For t=
he time between acceptance and publication most of the variation in delay c=
an be accounted for by differences between specific journals.=A0</div>
<div><br></div>
</div>

--f46d043be000356e1804e642093d--

        
--      
To unsubscribe from the BOAI Forum, use the form on this page:
http://mailman.ecs.soton.ac.uk/mailman/listinfo/boai-forum

[BOAI] [Forum Home] [index] [prev] [next] [options] [help]

 E-mail:  openaccess@soros.org .